Sunday, December 28, 2014

Snug Harbor (jazz club)

Snug Harbor is a popular jazz club, bar, and restaurant on Frenchmen Street in the Faubourg Marigny section of New Orleans, Louisiana.

It has been described as "the classiest jazz club in New Orleans" by The New York Times and as a "musical landmark" by Rolling Stone. It features live performances by both noted local and touring national jazz performers. Regulars include Charmaine Neville, Ellis Marsalis, and Irvin Mayfield.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014


A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects and provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education. The word "university" is derived from the Latin universitas magistrorum et scholarium, which roughly means "community of teachers and scholars.

The original Latin word "universitas" refers in general to "a number of persons associated into one body, a society, company, community, guild, corporation, etc." At the time of the emergence of urban town life and medieval guilds, specialised "associations of students and teachers with collective legal rights usually guaranteed by charters issued by princes, prelates, or the towns in which they were located" came to be denominated by this general term. Like other guilds, they were self-regulating and determined the qualifications of their members.

In modern usage the word has come to mean "An institution of higher education offering tuition in mainly non-vocational subjects and typically having the power to confer degrees," with the earlier emphasis on its corporate organization considered as applying historically to Medieval universities.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014


A presentation is the process of presenting a topic to an audience. It is typically a demonstration, lecture, or speech meant to inform, persuade, or build good will. The term can also be used for a formal or ritualized introduction or offering, as with the presentation of a debutante.

A presentation program, such as Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, Impress or Prezi, is often used to generate the presentation content. Modern internet-based presentation software, such as the presentation application in Google Docs and SlideRocket also allow presentations to be developed collaboratively by geographically disparate collaborators. Presentation viewers can be used to combine content from different presentation programs into one presentation.

Monday, November 24, 2014


A lecture (from the French 'lecture', meaning 'reading' [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories and equations. A politician's speech, a minister's sermon, or even a businessman's sales presentation may be similar in form to a lecture. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture's content.

Though lectures are much criticised as a teaching method, universities have not yet found practical alternative teaching methods for the large majority of their courses. Critics point out that lecturing is mainly a one-way method of communication that does not involve significant audience participation. Therefore, lecturing is often contrasted to active learning. Lectures delivered by talented speakers can be highly stimulating; at the very least, lectures have survived in academia as a quick, cheap and efficient way of introducing large numbers of students to a particular field of study.

The criticisms of lectures are often summarized by a quote generally misattributed to Mark Twain:

    College is a place where a professor’s lecture notes go straight to the students’ lecture notes, without passing through the brains of either.